Calvin and Culture – 1929 and All That, or What Does Calvinism Say to Historians Searching for Meaning

Chapter 1 is a study of the significance of John Calvin’s understanding of the doctrine of providence. In the second part of the chapter, Hart considers the implications for a Christian approach to history, and the limits in seeking meaning in history.

After God's Own Heart – David and Biblical Theology

The house of David is central to the Bible's message of salvation. Boda explores in Chapter 1 the theological theme of David and his household. He starts with David and New Testament theology, and proceeds to trace in the Old Testament the relationship between King David and God as king. Relevant passages considered are 1 Samuel 8, Romans 1:3, and 2 Corinthians 6:18.

Bringing Heaven Down to Earth – Lost in the Cornfield: Hope in Crisis

This volume is about Christian hope. Part of the Christian hope is heaven. The promise of an afterlife in heaven places our lives in a larger context, to fix us to a firm foundation. Bierma takes a look at the reasons why hope for the afterlife is not a heartfelt reality in our daily walk. Part of the answer can be found in misrepresentations people have about heaven and afterlife and Christ’s return, like the rapture.

Inconspicuous Providence – Reading Esther

The book of Esther is a good story. At the same time it is also a distinctively theological work. Chapter 1 of this book wants to help readers to understand the contribution Esther makes to the whole witness of Scripture. It notes how the book fits into the redemptive storyline that culminates in the person and work of Christ. The author believes that this provides the proper framework for a profitable reading of the book.

Revolutions in Worldview – Enlightenments and Awakenings: The Beginnings of Modern Culture Wars

The goal of this volume is to present the worldview characteristic of different periods of Western thought. Chapter 8 explores the life and worldview of the 18th century Enlightenment as it took shape in various countries accompanied by spiritual awakenings.

Wisdom Christology – The Need for Wisdom

The author wants to explore how the doctrine of Christ functioned as wisdom for the early church. He begins by considering a few introductory matters, including reasons to study Christology, and the focus on Christ as wisdom. The author also reflects on the nature and function of Jewish wisdom literature, and how wisdom is reconfigured in Christ.

Faith in the Face of Apostasy – Christians and the Old Testament

In Chapter 1 the author wants to encourage Christians to read the Old Testament as part of their heritage. To facilitate the reading and understanding of the Elijah and Elisha narratives, he encourage his readers to take note of at least three different historical horizons that intersect in these narratives. The first horizon is the historical background of the incidents. The next horizon is the historical background of the author. A third horizon is later biblical interpretation (e.g., Matthew 11:14.

How Jesus Transforms the Ten Commandments – The Covenant Lord Fulfils the Law

The author says that the ten commandments are a treaty document, and as such were written to define and secure the nature, character, and calling of Israel as the people of God. He reflects on the way the Lord went with his people throughout the Old Testament, and how in the end the law reaches its fulfilment in Christ. Clowney considers the significance of this fulfilment in Christ.

God's Lyrics – The Song of Moses: Te Deum of Triumph

We find the first song in the Old Testament in Exodus 15. Its focus and purpose is the magnification of God and his work. This chapter considers the theology and message of this Song of Moses as Moses led the people of the Lord God in worship. This song is again sung in Revelation 15 by those who conquered the Beast.

The Westminster Assembly – Perspectives on Westminster

Did the theological heirs of John Calvin deviate from their heritage? Was Calvin’s dynamic biblical theology lost by his successors? Was the philosophical methodology of Aristotle introduced into Reformed theology by Theodore Beza and Zacharias Ursinus? This chapter considers these criticisms as they were applied in particular to the tradition of the Westminster Standards. T. F.

The Flow of the Psalms – Introduction

Very often the book of Psalms is seen as a random collection of individual poems on a variety of topics. This framework assures very little to no awareness exists of a comprehension of the book’s total message, specific emphases, or any flow of the book’s structure and theology. Taking into account the structure of the book of Psalms as a whole makes significant contributions to the interpretive process. In the Introduction these points are expanded upon by Robertson.

Justification and the New Perspectives on Paul – How the Mighty Have Fallen: From Luther to Schweitzer

This book’s concern is with what has become known as the New Perspective on Paul, which is concerned with Paul's understanding of the lawworks of the law, righteousness, and other related issues. This chapter starts with a history of the study of Paul covering the period from Martin Luther to Albert Schweitzer.

Union with Christ – Creation

This is a volume on believers’ union with Christ. Letham argues that union with God is founded in the very being of God as Trinity and relational. Man being made in the image of God reflects this characteristic. First Letham looks at the Trinitarian basis of creation. Next he notes the role of the Son of God as the mediator of creation. Man as one created in Christ is to be recognized as image of God.

Immanuel in Our Place – Altars: Occasional Testimonies to Sacred Space

A place of worship between the fall and the exodus is called an altar. Chapter 2 gives an overview of how these altars functioned as places of God’s presence. Longman reflects on the altar law of Exodus 20: 24-26, the significance of the altars of Noah and the patriarchs (Genesis 12), and God’s special presence at these altars.

Why Does It Have to Hurt? – Why Is There Suffering at All? A Look at Genesis 3

Chapter 1 wrestles with the question why there is suffering at all. It first reflects on what suffering is. Next it unfolds the origin of human suffering by expounding on Genesis 3 and throwing light on the different contexts in which suffering is experienced. The chapter ends with questions for further reflection.

Same Lake, Different Boat – On Truth: The Four Missing Words

Chapter 1 explores three different views as to what is true about the nature of disability and about the nature of our world at large: the historical view (disability is an abnormal part of life in a normal world), the postmodern view (disability is a normal part of life in a normal world), and the biblical view (disability is a normal part of life in an abnormal world).

The Urban Face of Mission – Mission, Missions, Theology, and Theological Education

In Chapter 1 the author wants to address the isolation or marginalization of mission from theological training, theology from mission, and the church from the world. Conn offers possible reasons for this separation. He further suggests modifications that are currently being employed, and ends with some practical suggestions to encourage the process of modification.

Eyes to See, Ears to Hear – Why Do Bad Things Happen to Good People? A Biblical-Theological Approach

This chapter is about retribution. The author first considers the matter of blessing on the righteous and curses on the wicked, and whether the Bible supports the idea of reward for the righteous and punishment for the wicked.

Theological Guide to Calvin's Institutes – Justification and Union with Christ

Gaffin reflects in Chapter 11 on John Calvin’s view of justification and union with Christ in Book 3 of his Institutes of the Christian Religion. Gaffin gives a brief overview of the treatment of justification in successive editions of the Institutes from 1536 to 1559.

Truth in All Its Glory – Salvation Belongs to the Lord

What is Reformed theology? What does it mean to adhere to the Reformed faith? Do Reformed theologians claim that there is one all-encompassing summary of the Reformed faith? In Chapter 1 William Edgar claims that part of the task of ordering our theological ideas is to assign a centre and then move toward the periphery. At the heart of Reformed theology is the desire to credit all good things to God. Chapter 1 is a reflection on the significance of this desire and claim.

The Message of the General Epistles in the History of Redemption – An Eternal Inheritance: Salvation in 1 Peter

Crowe explores in Chapter 1 the significance of salvation in 1 Peter. He reflects on the meaning of the believers being called exiles/aliens/sojourners in 1 Peter and Scripture generally. Next he discusses the blessings of salvation. At the end of the chapter he provides some questions for reflection and discussion.

Living in the Light of Inextinguishable Hope – Hope for Dysfunctional Families (Genesis 37:1-11)

This chapter is a character study of Joseph, his brothers, and their father Jacob in Genesis 37:1-11. The authors reflect on the hope of the gospel as portrayed in this passage. Questions for further reflection are added at the chapter's end.

Redemptive History and Biblical Interpretation – The Idea of Biblical Theology as a Science and as a Theological Discipline

In Chapter 1 Vos puts forward his understanding of biblical theology as a theological discipline. He emphasizes the historical character of biblical revelation. The Bible was for Vos far from a series of isolated proof texts; it was for him an organism with a rich diversity that gives unanimous expression to its message of redemption.

Walking with Jesus through His Word – The Walk through the Bible That Sets Hearts Afire

What is redemptive-historical hermeneutics? Johnson argues that it means simply that every part of the Bible teaches Christ. The significance of this interpretation is illustrated by the change that took place in Jesus’ disciples’ understanding of Scripture from before to after Jesus’ resurrection. He further expounds the way the risen Lord read the Scriptures (cf. Luke 24:16-26).

The Unfolding Mystery – The New Man

What does it mean that Scripture is fulfilled in Jesus Christ? Wherein lies the unity of the Bible? Chapter 1 is an exercise in a redemptive-historical approach to an understanding of Scripture in which the stated questions are answered. The author reflects on the significance of Jesus being the image of God in the light of Adam who was first made in God’s image (Genesis 1:26-27).

Unshakable – Says Who? He Whose Word Cannot Be Broken

Chapter 1 considers the problem of authority. The focus of the problem may change in different periods of history, but the basic question is always the same: To whom or what should I ultimately submit? How can I know what is true and what is not? Different sources of authority are noted. The chapter is an unfolding of the authority of the Son of God as it is portrayed in the Epistle to the Hebrews.

Anointed with the Spirit and Power – The Spirit and Israel's Leaders

Chapter 1 traces the work of the Holy Spirit empowering the leaders of Israel in the Old Testament. Leaders noted are Joseph (Genesis 39:1ff.), Bezalel (Exodus 35:1–39:43), Moses and the seventy elders (Numbers 11:1–35), Joshua (Numbers 27:15–23), Othniel, Gideon, Jephthah, and Samson (Judges 3:1–16:31), Saul (1 Samuel 9:1–16:23), and David (1 Chronicles).

Thy Word Is Still Truth – Sola Scriptura: The Reformers' Rediscovery of the Written Word of God

This volume is an anthology of writings representing a high view of Scripture and reflecting the historic Reformed theological and confessional tradition. It offers a selection of texts on the doctrine of Scripture.

Revelation and Reason – Resurrection, Proof, and Presuppositionalism: Acts 17:30-31

What is the relationship between revelation and reason in apologetics? What is the role of revelation when biblical veracity itself is under attack? These concerns are major aspects of this chapter. The basic argument of this chapter is that the apostle Paul’s gospel of the resurrection functions as proof of final judgment in Acts 17:31.

The Doctrine of the Word of God – The Personal-Word Model

In Chapter 1 the author introduces the main contention of this volume on the doctrine of the Word of God, that the speech of God to man is real speech. God’s speech can be understood and man can be held accountable to respond appropriately. Frame’s thesis is that God’s Word is a personal communication from him to us.

Did God Really Say – Because It Is the Word of God

This volume emerges in a context where the church’s belief in the truthfulness and trustworthiness of Scripture as God’s written Word is being assaulted. Chapter 1 tries to relate the doctrine of Scripture and the first chapter of the Westminster Confession of Faith. Oliphint first reflects on why the confession starts with the doctrine of Scripture. He next set out a few highlights from the Confession.

Election and Free Will – Why a Book on Election and Free Will?

The subject of election, or predestination, raises many questions in people’s minds. In this book the author tries to answer many of those questions from the Scriptures. The first chapter introduces the importance of the subject, noting the biblical witness to God’s electing love and the search for assurance in the insecurity of contemporary life.

By Faith, Not by Sight – The Order of Salvation and the Theology of Paul

The author confronts the influence of the New Perspective on Paul. Gaffin’s controlling question throughout concerns Paul’s understanding of how the individual receives salvation. What does the application of salvation to sinners involve for Paul? Is a distinction between salvation accomplished (historia salutis) and salvation applied (ordo salutis) present in his preaching?

Women, Slaves, and the Gender Debate – The Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic

This chapter treats the gender debate that continues in the church today. Questions concerning the role of women in the church are not diminishing. On the one hand, complementarians argue that men and women are equal but have distinctive roles. On the other hand, egalitarians argue against making any role distinctions.

The Morality of God in the Old Testament – Introduction

How God can be considered to be morally good while at the same time he does things in the Old Testament that do not appear to us to be good? Examples are the imprecatory psalms and God’s command to Israel to exterminate every man, woman, and child of the Canaanites (e.g., Deuteronomy 20:12-18). Beale considers in this part of his introduction some proposed solutions to this apparent paradox.

What about Free Will – The Free-Will Problem

What is at stake in the debate over free will and the sovereignty of God? Is it possible to take seriously human freedom and at the same time honour God’s absolute sovereignty over his creation? If God is the one who determines the course of events in the lives of men, how can man be responsible for his actions? Should Christians still pray if God in any way holds the future in his hands?

The Faith Once Delivered – The Vitality of Reformed Systematic Theology

In this essay Gaffin concentrates on the inherent vigour of Reformed systematic theology and how best to preserve and nurture its strengths. He first addresses the matter of Reformed systematic theology’s use of its own exegetical tradition given in the discipline of biblical theology as developed by Geerhardus Vos.

Concise Reformed Dogmatics – Introduction

The part of Chapter 1 presented here introduces the function and nature of church dogmas or doctrines. It naturally involves a discussion of the relationship between the authority of Scripture and the tradition of the church. In the Reformed tradition Scripture functions as the highest norm. The authors emphasizes the ecclesiastical and confessional character of dogmas.

With Reverence and Awe – The Church and the World

Chapter 1 is an exposition of Heidelberg Catechism Lord’s Day 21, Q&A 54. The authors seek to understand from the Catechism what the relationship between the church and the world is in worship. Should the aim of the church be to make worship accessible to the world? Should worship be one occasion where the church displays her otherworldliness?

With Reverence and Awe – Sound Doctrine and Worship

Christians are increasingly divided over how they ought to worship God. There is significant confusion about the nature, purpose, and practice of worship. Questions that arise are, What do we expect from worship? Can we discern between good and bad worship? Is there such a thing as bad worship? How would we recognize it? The burden of the Introduction in this book is to demonstrate that how worship inevitably follows from our theological convictions.

Worship in Spirit and Truth – Some Basic Principles

In chapter 1, John Frame wants to give an answer to the question, “What is worship?" He emphasizes that it should be God-centred, gospel-centred, and it is worship of the triune God. He also explores how in worship attention should be given to the relationship with our fellow believers and society as a whole. Frame also explains his understanding of worship in a narrow and broader meaning.