Covenant of Grace: Chapter 5 – The Covenant of Grace and Public Worship

This article discusses how the doctrine of the covenant of grace impacts worship. It explains that God is with his people in a special way when they are gathered in public worship. Then it outlines the various elements of a Reformed worship service, as well as its structure. The article concludes with questions for reflection and discussion.

God's Lyrics – The Song of Moses: Te Deum of Triumph

We find the first song in the Old Testament in Exodus 15. Its focus and purpose is the magnification of God and his work. This chapter considers the theology and message of this Song of Moses as Moses led the people of the Lord God in worship. This song is again sung in Revelation 15 by those who conquered the Beast.

Family Worship – As for Me and My House We Will Serve the Lord: Family Worship in the Bible

God is worthy of the daily worship of families. There is no direct, explicit commandment in Scripture about family worship, but the Bible certainly implies that God is to be worshipped in our homes. The author discusses this view with a number of scriptural examples and exhortations.

The Psalter Reclaimed – What Are We Doing Singing the Psalms

In this chapter Wenham first gives a brief overview of the history of the use of the Psalms in congregational worship. He also discusses the specific impact of setting the words of the Psalms to music. Wenham further notes a secondary use of the Psalms, as a resource for private meditation and devotion. He suggests that the book of Psalms is a deliberately organized anthology designed for memorization.

Immanuel in Our Place – Altars: Occasional Testimonies to Sacred Space

A place of worship between the fall and the exodus is called an altar. Chapter 2 gives an overview of how these altars functioned as places of God’s presence. Longman reflects on the altar law of Exodus 20: 24-26, the significance of the altars of Noah and the patriarchs (Genesis 12), and God’s special presence at these altars.

With Reverence and Awe – The Church and the World

Chapter 1 is an exposition of Heidelberg Catechism Lord’s Day 21, Q&A 54. The authors seek to understand from the Catechism what the relationship between the church and the world is in worship. Should the aim of the church be to make worship accessible to the world? Should worship be one occasion where the church displays her otherworldliness?

With Reverence and Awe – Sound Doctrine and Worship

Christians are increasingly divided over how they ought to worship God. There is significant confusion about the nature, purpose, and practice of worship. Questions that arise are, What do we expect from worship? Can we discern between good and bad worship? Is there such a thing as bad worship? How would we recognize it? The burden of the Introduction in this book is to demonstrate that how worship inevitably follows from our theological convictions.

Worship in Spirit and Truth – Some Basic Principles

In chapter 1, John Frame wants to give an answer to the question, “What is worship?" He emphasizes that it should be God-centred, gospel-centred, and it is worship of the triune God. He also explores how in worship attention should be given to the relationship with our fellow believers and society as a whole. Frame also explains his understanding of worship in a narrow and broader meaning.

Worshipping With Calvin - Setting the Ecclesiastical Scene

This book argues for the historic Reformed Protestant approach to worship and ministry over against contemporary styles of worship. This chapter paints a picture of the challenges regarding worship which face evangelical and reformed churches today. The author maintains that the heritage of Reformed worship, which weaves theology, piety and worship together, is the cure for these challenges.